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Real Estate

Buying a house? Know your negotiation points.

Whether you are a first-time homebuyer or a seasoned veteran, the negotiation part of the transaction can be daunting and stressful. Above and beyond the purchase price, what should you be prepared to negotiate when buying a home?

  1. Closing costs. Your closing costs are determined by a variety of factors, but you can expect it to be between 2% to 4% of the purchase price. Ask the seller to cover some or all of the closing costs upfront or request a closing credit that can be used to make specific updates and fixes to the home.
  2. Inspection and closing timing. Buyer offers that include a quick inspection and close timeline are often more attractive to sellers who have been going through the process for far too long. Just ensure you allow yourself ample time to get your financing in place and complete proper, thorough inspections.
  3. Home warranty. Sellers will often agree to pay the premium on the home warranty at closing and then hand it off to the new homeowner, who is responsible for the deductible on any future claims.
  4. Inspection items. Your inspection may uncover small or large repairs needed to bring the home up to standard. You can negotiate to have these items fixed before closing or ask for a price reduction to cover the costs.
  5. Furnishings. Though this is often best negotiated after a contract is in place, buyers often negotiate keeping couches, fixtures, landscaping items, patio furniture, appliances, and more. Sellers often agree, making a win-win for both parties.
Real Estate

Dunwoody: One ‘o’ or two?

Two. (But only for a post office error.)

Creek Indians settled along the banks of the Chattahoochee River, but it is Maj. Charles Dunwody — just one ‘o’ in his name— that is considered Dunwoody’s earliest pioneer. Raised in Roswell’s Mimosa Hall—which still stands today—Charles returned to the area after the Civil War. He purchased farm land, two horses and built his home at the intersection of Chamblee Dunwoody and Spalding Roads not far from a railroad stop that connected Roswell and downtown Atlanta. Dunwody raised his family there and new families settled close by.

Fifteen or so miles from burgeoning Atlanta, the area was popular for summer homes for many businessmen and their families.

The spelling error occurred with Dunwody’s petition to open a post office for the community. A clerk added an ‘o’ to the application, and the community of Dunwoody was born. Dunwoody became an official city more than 125 years later, on December 1, 2008.

Learn more Dunwoody history on this video produced by the Dunwoody Preservation Trust.